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The real trend of the season is your thumb

The aesthetic that from activewear has reached luxury

The real trend of the season is your thumb The aesthetic that from activewear has reached luxury
@helmutlang
Marine Serre FW19
La Montagne FW21, Jacquemus
Marine Serre FW19
Marine Serre FW19
Marine Serre FW19
Marine Serre FW18
La Montagne FW21, Jacquemus
La Montagne FW21, Jacquemus
La Montagne FW21, Jacquemus
@coperni
@coperni
@helmutlang

Can we talk about a trend when the recurring element is not a print, a color or even a material (like mohair this season), but a simple detail, an almost hidden habit that goes unnoticed? In some cases, yes, especially if that detail begins to make its appearance on the catwalks of the major luxury houses, completing yet another luxury translation of a detail born in the world of activewear. Hand in hand with balaclavas, opera gloves and knitted handwarmers, one of the season's micro trends would have been very popular with Fonzie from Happy Days: thumb holes, literally thumb holes, or mitten-sleeved garments. In short, longer sleeves, just enough to cover a large part of the hand, while allowing a glimpse of fingers and thumb. The functionality of an apparently insignificant detail is linked to the context in which it was born, that of sport, since for decades it has represented an inevitable touch on sweatshirts and thermal clothing for running, on turtlenecks and sleeveless shirts for skiing, assuming a new identity in the world of yoga, where brands like Lululemon have made it their distinctive sign. Warmth and comfort may not be the only reasons behind brands' obsession with thumb holes.

@helmutlang
@coperni
@coperni
@helmutlang

“An interesting thing we discovered is that if a top has a thumb hole, the consumer perceives it as a top quality top,” said Jeanne Jackson, president of distribution and merchandising at Nike. A mere illusion, therefore, which has not escaped the big names in luxury. On the Chanel FW21 catwalk, under the classic bouclé suit, a black turtleneck peeped out that left hands and thumbs clearly visible, also thanks to the shimmering logo formed by the two intertwined C's. At Nina Ricci, the thumb holes trend has taken shape in sheer t-shirts worn under vibrant mini balloon dresses. Alessandro Michele of Gucci gave it a sexier touch, combining the trend with lace and transparencies. For the La Montagne FW21 collection, Jacquemus borrowed this detail from the mountain aesthetic to make the hourglass midi dresses more affectionate and eclectic, in a successful contrast of inspirations. Coperni made thumbholes an avant-garde detail on her sparkling turtlenecks, Opening Ceremony used them on logoed sweaters, Tom Ford made them an unexpected element in luxurious cashmere sweaters, Marine Serre turned them into faithful companions of the his now iconic model. Helmut Lang made the inevitable detail in a top with a minimal allure. The thumbhole trend was soon reinterpreted by the fast fashion world too, with Cos and H&M in pole position as big supporters of this aesthetic.

Marine Serre FW19
Marine Serre FW19
Marine Serre FW18
La Montagne FW21, Jacquemus
La Montagne FW21, Jacquemus
La Montagne FW21, Jacquemus
It is not clear what is so fascinating about making the thumb the protagonist of a top, perhaps the hand gestures, the manicure, that slightly emo, slightly sporty allure exert a charm that should not be underestimated. The thumb holes thus become an expedient to play down otherwise serious garments, adding a casual touch to the world of luxury.

 

Marine Serre FW19
La Montagne FW21, Jacquemus
Marine Serre FW19