In these hours to "break" the Internet is just news: the controversy between Dolce & Gabbana and China. The designer couple was preparing for a show-event at the Shanghai Expo. Everything was ready for Wednesday, November 21st. There was the location, there were the models, the guests and more than 500 clothes. Then, suddenly, everything is gone. Went to the sound of post Instagram and poisonous comments. How? Let's go back a few days.

Visualizza questo post su Instagram

#DGlovesChina ? More like #DGdesperateforthatChineseRMB lol.  In a bid to further appeal to luxury's covetable Chinese consumers, @dolcegabbana released some hella offensive “instructional” videos on the usage of chopsticks.  Pandering at it's finest, but taken up a notch by painting their target demographic as a tired and false stereotype of a people lacking refinement/culture to understand how to eat foreign foods and an over-the-top embellishment of cliché ambient music, comical pronunciations of foreign names/words, and Chinese subtitles (English added by us), which begs the question—who is this video actually for?  It attempts to target China, but instead mocks them with a parodied vision of what modern China is not...a gag for amusement. Dolce & Gabbana have already removed the videos from their Chinese social media channels, but not Instagram.  Stefano Gabbana has been on a much-needed social media cleanse (up until November 2nd), so maybe he kept himself busy by meddling with the marketing department for this series. Who wants to bet the XL cannoli “size” innuendos were his idea? Lmao. • #dolceandgabbana #altamoda #rtw #dgmillennials #stefanogabbana #shanghai #chinese #italian #cannoli #meme #wtf #dumb #lame #chopsticks #foodie #tutorial #cuisine #italianfood #asianmodel #asian #chinesefood #dietprada

Un post condiviso da Diet Prada (@diet_prada) in data:

Saturday Dolce & Gabbana posted on the Weibo platform, a sort of Chinese Twitter, three promotional videos with the hashtags #DGLovesChina and #DGTheGreatShow. In the pictures we see a young oriental woman who, awkward, eats pizza, spaghetti and a Sicilian cannoli with traditional chopsticks, while, off the field, a male voice gives her advice on how to approach those Italian dishes. Immediately a host of indignant, led by Diet Prada, bubble the advertising operation as "offensive", to spread "a parodic vision of what modern China is not ... a gag for fun" thanks to the stereotypical aspect of the chosen protagonist, a model with small almond eyes and a naive smile and, above all, thanks to a series of squalid allusions, full of sexist double meanings like "It's still too big for you, is not it?".

On the fashion house falls a shower of negative comments and the hashtag #BoycottDolce becomes a trend, forcing the Italian brand to remove all the videos from Weibo. Problem solved? No, because to reinvigorate the controversy comes from the official IG profile of Stefano Gabbana, often the protagonist of bitter quarrel (remember when he called Selena Gomez "ugly"), a conversation in which the designer offends China and its population and in a contemptuous way and to the sound of "pupù" emoticons. Immediately local celebrities such as actresses Zhang Ziyi and Li Bingbing or singer Wang Junkai say they do not want to attend the show; the China Bentley Modeling agency refuses to let its models work and, according to rumors, the political pressures are so strong that only one decision remains: cancel the show.

To placate the minds, now decidedly fiery, not even the latest announcement by Dolce & Gabbana that declare that their accounts have been hacked and swear to have only enormous respect for the country that would host the one as one of the most innovative and luxurious of all time.

Visualizza questo post su Instagram

As @dolcegabbana prepares to mount their next runway show in Shanghai this coming evening (7:30PM) and the rest of Instagram fawns over what’s sure to be an overly lavish “love letter” to China, we’ll be wondering if we’ll see chopsticks as hair ornaments, take-out boxes as purses, or even kimonos misappropriated as Chinese costume. Time will tell. For now, we’ll let y’all simmer on this DM between Stefano and Dieter @michaelatranova (chronology is reversed in slides). Word has it that they’re still in the process of model casting (over 200 Asian girls scheduled)...wouldn’t let them walk the show if we were their agents lol. Also, curious what the Chinese government will think of their country being called shit basically...especially considering how strict they are on who to allow to enter the country on work visas based on a thorough social media background checks. • #DGTheGreatShow #DGlovesChina #runway #fashionshow #cancelled #racism #dolceandgabbana #altamoda #rtw #dgmillennials #stefanogabbana #shanghai #chinese #china #wtf #dumb #lame #asianmodel #asian #dietprada

Un post condiviso da Diet Prada (@diet_prada) in data:

Visualizza questo post su Instagram

You saw it here first! What an interesting few hours spent wreaking havoc on @dolcegabbana ’s ill-fated #DGTheGreatShow while sitting on our couch juuling and eating gelato (not with chopsticks) lol. Thank you to @michaelatranova @helenatranova @anthxnyxo for sharing their DMs and to all the Chinese Dieters who furiously updated us with translations by the minute. For anyone that believes their account was actually hacked, see slide #2 of Stefano reposting the same DM on his stories before shit hit the fan. Oh the irony of him loving to cry “fake news” and promptly dishing it out himself via his and the brand IG account. Check our story highlight “#DGTheShitShow” for the full recap. • #DGTheGreatShow #DGlovesChina #runway #fashionshow #cancelled #racism #dolceandgabbana #altamoda #rtw #dgmillennials #stefanogabbana #shanghai #chinese #china #wtf #dumb #lame #asianmodel #asian #dietprada

Un post condiviso da Diet Prada (@diet_prada) in data:

Now the damage is done. The hashtag #BoycottDolce continues on the web, the company's reputation is affected and there are big negative repercussions for the brand that in the state has 25 stores and dreamed of conquering a large share of the luxury market of the Dragon that seems to be worth about 72 billion dollars, equal to almost a third of the value that the sector records at a global level, according to a report by McKinsey in 2017. Will Dolce & Gabbana recover? And their misadventure will have repercussions on China's destiny and relations with other Italian brands?