We recently discovered Edoardo Buscaroli who under his @airdononcicredo Instagram profile creates hybrids of iconic sneakers with classic masterpieces from art history. We spoke to Edoardo to get an insight into the thoughts behind his creations, and he's also made a new piece exclusively for nss that we have the pleasure of revealing below.

Interview with Edoardo Buscaroli A look into his mix of sneakers and art masterpieces | Image 6
Interview with Edoardo Buscaroli A look into his mix of sneakers and art masterpieces | Image 8
Interview with Edoardo Buscaroli A look into his mix of sneakers and art masterpieces | Image 5
Interview with Edoardo Buscaroli A look into his mix of sneakers and art masterpieces | Image 4
Interview with Edoardo Buscaroli A look into his mix of sneakers and art masterpieces | Image 7
Interview with Edoardo Buscaroli A look into his mix of sneakers and art masterpieces | Image 3
Interview with Edoardo Buscaroli A look into his mix of sneakers and art masterpieces | Image 0
Interview with Edoardo Buscaroli A look into his mix of sneakers and art masterpieces | Image 9
Interview with Edoardo Buscaroli A look into his mix of sneakers and art masterpieces | Image 2
Interview with Edoardo Buscaroli A look into his mix of sneakers and art masterpieces | Image 1
 

 

#1 Hello Edoardo, for those who don't know you please, introduce yourself.

I am a 20-year-old guy and I study Graphic Design and Art Direction in Milan. Beauty fascinates me in all its forms: art, music, fashion, architecture and design.

 

#2 How did you come up with the idea to start mixing classic art masterpieces with sneakers?

I felt the necessity to communicate my message through an Instagram profile (I already had one, but very personal, which had nothing to do with these two worlds).

For a long time, I wondered how far we had arrived in the streetwear and sneakers world. I read of stylists compared to gods, I saw people sleeping outside the shops to resell the latest model of sneakers to little more than retail price, I found beautiful shoes still on the shelves of shops, for the only fault of not being hype and Instagram profiles on which people flaunted proud their clothes, as if it was an art show. So I decided to show my collection, but with the art show.

 

#3 What are you trying to convey with your creations?

My project wants to reflect on the value we attach to our wardrobe these days.

In recent years the sneaker market has exploded and people are willing to spend real follies to grab the latest model. The shoes have become the objects of worship, considered as works of art. But is it really like that? I do not think so, but in the meantime, I have fun in approaching paintings that have made history with shoes that are doing it.

 

#4 Beyond the clear color connection between the sneakers and the painting, how do you choose which painting to pair with which sneaker?

Interview with Edoardo Buscaroli A look into his mix of sneakers and art masterpieces | Image 0
The choice of similar colors between sneaker and picture is only a small part of the research process. Each shoe has its own "mood" and its history and, trying to catch it, I look for some works of art that are related with the philosophy or the context of the shoe. For example, in the picture above, I decided to combine the Air Max 97 Silver, a sneaker inspired by Japanese high-speed trains, with Vetements x DHL socks (shipping company that represents the speed and the frenzy of our age) and as a framework “Elasticity” by Umberto Boccioni, a pivotal work of Italian Futurism, a movement whose fundamental principles are dynamism, modernity, and technique.

 

#5 How do you see your art evolving?

I do not define myself as an artist, as much as a creative person. My images are not artworks, but compositions. The artists are those who create, I am the curator of an exhibition, I select "wall" and "foot" works to offer them to the public. It is impossible to know already how my works will evolve because from time to time the creative ideas give expression to my thought.