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Castore is gaining power in the kit supplier's market

The deals with Aston Villa, Bayer Leverkusen and Sevilla tells us a different way to became a football sponsor

Castore is gaining power in the kit supplier's market The deals with Aston Villa, Bayer Leverkusen and Sevilla tells us a different way to became a football sponsor

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The indiscretions about Aston Villa, Bayer Leverkusen and Sevilla leaving their kit suppliers to sign with Castore are a signal in the changing landscape of soccer sponsorship. There are no details and numbers available right now but the young english company is setting the course to become a powerhouse, expanding outside the UK. Founded by two brothers, Tom and Phil Beahon, in 2016 Castore initially was focused on performance materials but, with Andy Murray’s help, they quickly levelled up to the soccer field. 

They are now one of the two UK companies, beside Umbro, to dress a Premier League team thanks to Newcastle United and Wolverhampton. And now with these new deals they are crossing the English Channel, coming to the continent and maybe someday to Italy. A supersonic growth that proves how reliability and professionalism are still rewarded in a market dominated by international players. 


A goal acquired with a pinpoint strategy, different from the previous suppliers in the jersey’s quality and the customer’s care. One of the reasons why Sevilla chose to switch from Nike and their 2.3 millions/year to Castore is the possibility to have more control in bespoke merchandising items, especially off-pitch lifestyle products. A choice made with the intent to invest on their brand and restyle their football team to be more inclusive for the hardcore supporter and also for who in football is searching a product more similar to lifestyle than to the sport side. Similar to Macron and Kappa in Italy, Castore aims for a disruptive approach rather than following the international company 's, working on product customization. With a tight connection to the customers, they can answer the client’s need in reaching a unique product and create a trustworthy relation. Something that the big brands can’t do.


Over the past few years even the second level teams are starting to realize how important creating a recognizable brand is. Something that can work outside the pitch, in a market made up of not only fans and supporters but also to collectionist and football lovers. A market that thanks to brands like Castore it’s starting to open up even for teams with less tradition and less reach.